Speaking In Kansas City

I’ll be in Kansas City next week doing some SSIS training. I don’t think I’ve ever been to KC so I’m looking forward to the trip!

When I found out I would be in town, I dutifully contacted the Kansas City SQL Server Users Group to see if they were having a meeting. When traveling I like to check out Users Groups to see what other folks are doing and also to learn something!

The Kansas City folks decided to hold a meeting since I was available and willing to speak, so I’ll be talking about Change Data Capture, Incremental Loads, and SSIS 2008 Tuesday, 20 May 2008. I’m looking forward to meeting as many people from the area as possible!

 :{> Andy

Speaking In Kansas City

I’ll be in Kansas City next week doing some SSIS training. I don’t think I’ve ever been to KC so I’m looking forward to the trip!

When I found out I would be in town, I dutifully contacted the Kansas City SQL Server Users Group to see if they were having a meeting. When traveling I like to check out Users Groups to see what other folks are doing and also to learn something!

The Kansas City folks decided to hold a meeting since I was available and willing to speak, so I’ll be talking about Change Data Capture, Incremental Loads, and SSIS 2008 Tuesday, 20 May 2008. I’m looking forward to meeting as many people from the area as possible!

 :{> Andy

Cisco VPN Client and Vista x64

I am disappointed in Cisco.

I have Vista Ultimate x64 installed on my snappy new Red laptop but I cannot install Cisco VPN Client software on it because Cisco VPN Client does not run on Vista 64-bit platforms.

Digging around for a work-around, I came across a couple interesting comments. One comment, from someone who claims to be with Cisco VPN Client Support, states:

“…as mentioned many times on this thread, NO x86-64 support for Windows. Cisco IPSec client will NOT be ported to support 64bit version of Windows now or in the future. If you require 64bit support on Windows please look at migrating to AnyConnect.

Does Cisco think 64-bit OS’s are a passing fad? Are they holding out for the 128-bit operating systems before bothering to release an upgrade? What’s the logic behind such a move? There has to be some logical explanation…

Release Notes for AnyConnect version 2.2 indicate something new (hardware?) is required to work with 64-bit Vista, but it’s entirely possible I’m misreading the notes. I do not know what an Adaptive Security Appliance is.

Other applications install and run in 32-bit mode. Is there some reason – security-related or other – that the Cisco VPN client cannot run in this mode?

I’m forced to create a virtual PC with a 32-bit OS installed just so I can communicate with clients remotely. It is, as I wrote earlier, disappointing.

:{> Andy

Cisco VPN Client and Vista x64

I am disappointed in Cisco.

I have Vista Ultimate x64 installed on my snappy new Red laptop but I cannot install Cisco VPN Client software on it because Cisco VPN Client does not run on Vista 64-bit platforms.

Digging around for a work-around, I came across a couple interesting comments. One comment, from someone who claims to be with Cisco VPN Client Support, states:

“…as mentioned many times on this thread, NO x86-64 support for Windows. Cisco IPSec client will NOT be ported to support 64bit version of Windows now or in the future. If you require 64bit support on Windows please look at migrating to AnyConnect.

Does Cisco think 64-bit OS’s are a passing fad? Are they holding out for the 128-bit operating systems before bothering to release an upgrade? What’s the logic behind such a move? There has to be some logical explanation…

Release Notes for AnyConnect version 2.2 indicate something new (hardware?) is required to work with 64-bit Vista, but it’s entirely possible I’m misreading the notes. I do not know what an Adaptive Security Appliance is.

Other applications install and run in 32-bit mode. Is there some reason – security-related or other – that the Cisco VPN client cannot run in this mode?

I’m forced to create a virtual PC with a 32-bit OS installed just so I can communicate with clients remotely. It is, as I wrote earlier, disappointing.

:{> Andy

Kevin Hazzard on LINQ To SQL

Kevin Hazzard did an outstanding job presenting to the Richmond SQL Server Users Group this evening on LINQ To SQL!

I really like the ORM / code generation aspects of this new feature of the .Net Framework 3.5. Seeing it in action made me yearn (a little) for my application developer days.

Kevin’s VPC crashed a couple hours before his presentation so he recreated the presentation and three demos in 1.5 hours before the meeting – and they were not simple demos, especially the last one.

It’s always cool to watch technology in the hands of a master.

:{> Andy

Kevin Hazzard on LINQ To SQL

Kevin Hazzard did an outstanding job presenting to the Richmond SQL Server Users Group this evening on LINQ To SQL!

I really like the ORM / code generation aspects of this new feature of the .Net Framework 3.5. Seeing it in action made me yearn (a little) for my application developer days.

Kevin’s VPC crashed a couple hours before his presentation so he recreated the presentation and three demos in 1.5 hours before the meeting – and they were not simple demos, especially the last one.

It’s always cool to watch technology in the hands of a master.

:{> Andy

On Developer Communities: A Sponsor’s Case Study

Introduction

I wrote a series of posts recently about the developer community. I started each post with a linked summary of the previous posts, which I will continue here:

On Developer Communities… 

I hold the following hypotheses about successful, growing, and thriving developer communities:

  1. First, you need a team builder
  2. You can run a company like a user group, but the inverse is not always true.
  3. Quality always works.
  4. People are not resources or assets.
  5. Don’t go away.
  6. Have a (Sponsorship) Plan

A Sponsor’s Perspective

I recently emailed one of our sponsors to ask them “What do you get out of this?” With his permission, I share the response from Brock Barnett of MaconIT, a direct hire staffing and consulting firm in the Richmond, Charlottesville, and Roanoke Virginia markets:

MaconIT has been involved with the Richmond .NET and Richmond SQL Server User Groups for a couple of years. Over the past two years we’ve become Platinum sponsors and our investment (both time and money) has been well worth it. Our involvement with the User Groups has allowed us to get introduced to new clients, potential new candidates, learn cutting edge technology and expand our name recognition in the area. The committment that the User Groups have made to Richmond have also helped to promote the growth of Microsoft products in the area which in turn has helped to keep the local IT market very dynamic. While it’s sometimes difficult to measure ROI, we feel that our sponsorship of the User Groups has been vital to our growth. We feel very fortunate to have been a part of the .NET and SQL Server Groups and look forward to continued invovlement!

Thanks to Brock, Gregg, and Carin at MaconIT and dozens of companies in the Richmond market, the Richmond Developer Community is experiencing record participation, growth, and event attendance. We appreciate all our sponsors do for us!

Conclusion

I believe successful user groups are part of the local business ecosystem. We fill a niche by providing free training to folks who are interested enough to give up an evening or day of personal time to attend an event. These people are the passionate developers (or developers-to-be) that companies like MaconIT want to represent in the market. And, believe it or not, schmoozing with the local developer community is an excellent networking opportunity. At each meeting, someone is in attendance looking for a developer or DBA. Cards and email addresses are exchanged and announcements are made.

It’s really cool of local technology companies like MaconIT to participate in our endeavors. It’s even better that they realize tangible results for their participation. I love win-win scenarios!

:{> Andy