Mean Time to Identify Failure

While managing a team of 40 ETL developers, I wanted to track lots of metrics. Some of the things I wanted to track were technical, like SSIS package execution times. Some metrics were people-centric. 

Andy’s First Rule of Statistics states:

You can use statistics for anything about people, except people.

Andy – circa 2005

It was important to me to track how long it took the on-call person to identify the problem. I didn’t use the information to beat on-call people over the head. I used the information to measure the results of several experiments for displaying metadata about the failure.

Reports For The Win

You may be as shocked by this as I was; reports helped a lot more than I anticipated. Before I deployed the reports the Mean Time to Identify Failure was tracking just under 30 minutes. After deploying the reports, the mean time to identify failure fell to 5 minutes.

As I said, I was shocked. There were mitigating circumstances. The on-call team members were getting more familiar with the information SSIS produces when it logs an error. They were gaining experience, seeing similar errors more than once.

I accounted for growing familiarity by narrowing the time window I examined. The least-impressive metrics put the reduction at 18 minutes to 5 minutes.

Pictures…

(click to enlarge)

Before I built and deployed the dashboard for SSIS Application Instances (like the one pictured at the top of this post), on-call people would query custom-logging tables we built to monitor enterprise data integration. The queries to return Application Instance log data were stored where everyone could reach them. In fact, I used the same queries as sources for this report.

A funny thing happened when I deployed the reports. Each week, one or more on-call people would ping me and tell me how much they liked the reports. Even though the data was the same, the presentation was different. A picture with a little color goes a long way.

The image at the beginning of this section – the SSIS Framework Task Instance Report – is displayed when a user clicks the Failed link shown in the initial screenshot. This design received he most comment by the on-call team members. The most common comment was, “I click the Failed link and it takes me to details about the failure.” The reports were passing The 2:00 AM Test.

SSIS Framework Applications

If you’ve read this far and wondered, “Andy, what’s an SSIS Application?” An SSIS Application is a construct I came up with to describe a collection of SSIS Packages configured to execute in a specific order. An application is a way to group SSIS packages for execution. You can get a sense of how our frameworks work – especially the application execution functionality – by checking out the SSIS Framework Community Edition at DILM Suite (DILM == Data Integration Lifecycle Management).

(click to enlarge)

An Application Instance is an instance of execution of an SSIS Application. An Application Instance is made up of Package Instances. the relationship between applications and packages appears straightforward: an application is a collection of packages; parent-child; one-to-many. But it’s not quite that simple. Our SSIS Frameworks facilitate patterns that execute the same package multiple times, sometimes in parallel! We can also create packages that perform utility functions – such as ArchiveFile.dtsx – and call it from multiple applications. When you do the Boolean algebra, the relationship between applications and packages is many-to-many. 

Our SSIS Frameworks are SSIS Catalog-integrated. They even work with the SSIS Integration Runtime that’s part of Azure Data Factory, Azure-SSIS. 

Dashboards… Evolved

While the Reporting Services dashboard was neat when it was released back in the day, the cool kids now play with Power BI. At DILM Suite you will also find a free – albeit basic – Power BI dashboard that surfaces many of the same metrics using even better reporting technology. The Basic SSIS Catalog Dashboard in Power BI is free at DILM Suite.

I’ve not yet collected Mean Time to Identify Failure metrics using the Basic SSIS Catalog Dashboard in Power BI dashboard. Perhaps you can be the first.

Enjoy!

Free Stuff for People Who Give Back: Announcing 2019 Scholarships

I haven’t advertised this in the past and… I’m not sure why: I donate licenses for SSIS Catalog Compare and (non-free) SSIS Framework Editions – and subscriptions to Biml Academy and SSIS Academy – to individuals who work for charities and non-profit organizations. I am honored to announce our 2019 Scholarships.

I was inspired to make this public after reading this post over at Brent Ozar Unlimited.

Free Stuff for Charities and Non-Profit Organizations

  

Do you work for a charity or non-profit organization? Submit your application today.

Discounted Consulting Services

In addition to donating free licenses to our software and online training sites, Enterprise Data & Analytics offers a discounted rate to charities and non-profits for consulting services.

We are here to help.™ How may we serve you? Contact us today and let us know!

Using SSIS Framework Community Edition Webinar 20 Sep

Join me 20 Sep 2018 at noon ET for a free webinar titled Using SSIS Framework Community Edition!

Abstract

SSIS Framework Community Edition is free and open source. You may know can use SSIS Framework Community Edition to execute a collection of SSIS packages using a call to a single stored procedure passing a single parameter. But did you know you can also use it to execute a collection of SSIS packages in Azure Data Factory SSIS Integration Runtime? You can!

In this free webinar, Andy discusses and demonstrates SSIS Framework Community Edition – on-premises and in the cloud.

Join SSIS author, BimlHero, consultant, trainer, and blogger Andy Leonard at noon EDT Thursday 20 Sep 2018 as he demonstrates using Biml to make an on-premises copy of an Azure SQL DB.

I hope to see you there!

Register today.

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Announcing the Fundamentals of Azure Data Factory Course!

I am excited to announce a brand new course (it still has that new course smell) from Brent Ozar Unlimited and honored to deliver it! This one-day, live, online course is titled Fundamentals of Azure Data Factory and it’s designed to introduce you to Azure Data Factory (ADF).

There will be demos.
Live demos.
Lots of live demos!

Abstract

Azure Data Factory, or ADF, is an Azure PaaS (Platform-as-a-Service) that provides hybrid data integration at global scale. Use ADF to build fully managed ETL in the cloud – including SSIS. Join Andy Leonard – authorblogger, and Chief Data Engineer at Enterprise Data & Analytics – as he demonstrates practical Azure Data Factory use cases.

In this course, you’ll learn:

  • The essentials of Azure Data Factory (ADF)
  • Developing, testing, scheduling, monitoring, and managing ADF pipelines
  • Lifting and shifting SSIS to ADF SSIS Integration Runtime (Azure-SSIS)
  • ADF design patterns
  • Data Integration Lifecycle Management (DILM) for the cloud and hybrid data integration scenarios

To know if you’re ready for this class, look for “yes” answers to these questions:

  • Do you want to learn more about cloud data integration in Azure Data Factory?
  • Is your enterprise planning to migrate its data, databases, data warehouse(s), or some of them, to the cloud?
  • Do you currently use SSIS?

The next delivery is scheduled for 10 Dec 2018. Register today!

I hope to see you there.

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DILM Suite + Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime

DILM Suite was designed to support enterprise data engineering / data integration with SSIS. But the solutions, utilities, and tools work well with Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime (ADF IR, or “SSIS in the cloud”).

As I mentioned in my post titled The Cloud Costs Money, leaving ADF Integration Runtime running can get pricey – and fast.

Most DILM Suite Functions Do Not Require ADF Integration Runtime to be Running

That’s right. Since DILM Suite tools and utilities connect directly to the database, they do not require Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime to be in a running state for most operations.

Here, for example, I’ve connected Framework Browser to an instance of SSIS Framework Community Edition – deployed to the ADF Integration Runtime as demonstrated in the latest Summer-O’-ADF webinar, Designing a Custom ADF SSIS Execution Framework – doesn’t have to be in a Running state to allow interaction with Framework Browser and Catalog Browser (click to enlarge):

That’s handy information right there. And it can save you money.

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Updates to Three DILM Suite Applications

It’s been a busy couple weeks here at Enterprise Data & Analytics in Farmville. I just published updates to not one, not two, but three – yes, three! – applications that are part of the Data Integration Lifecycle Management Suite, or DILM Suite.

SSIS Framework Community Edition

To prepare for Thursday’s (12 Jul 2018) webinar titled Designing a Custom ADF SSIS Execution Framework, I updated the documentation for SSIS Framework Community Edition. Why did I update the documentation? Because I want folks to know they can use SSIS Framework Community Edition in the cloud! That’s right, SSIS Framework Community Edition – still free, still open source – works with the SSIS Catalog behind Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime.

SSIS Framework Browser

Also in preparation for Thursday’s webinar, I updated SSIS Framework Browser! Version 0.4.2.0 (beta) remains free and now also works with SSIS Framework Community Edition implemented in Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime. Use Framework Browser to view metadata for SSIS Applications and Application Packages stored in the Framework.

SSIS Catalog Browser

Finally, I updated the login experience for those using SSIS Catalog Browser to connect to Azure Data Factory Integration Runtime. As with all Catalog Browser updates, I’ve applied the same updates to the user experience in SSIS Catalog Compare. Which reminds me…

SSIS Catalog Compare

On Thursday 19 Jul 2018 at noon EDT, I’m delivering another free webinar titled Use SSIS Catalog Compare to Lift and Shift SSIS to ADF! In this webinar, I will be demonstrating some of the features in version 3, which is approaching Preview.

I hope you will join me for these upcoming webinars and that you’ll take the free DILM Suite products for a test drive!

The Summer-O’-ADF Series Continues!

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